Upcoming UN ECE R 141 Regulation Guide

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In 2019, the EU commission made another update to the UN ECE R141 regulation which concerns the monitoring of tyres. In the following guide, we will go into details about how these changes will impact you and your business.

What is the UN ECE R141 regulation?

With the implementation of the UN ECE R141 regulation (based on ECE R64-regulation) by the EU commission in 2012, Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) became mandatory for all vehicles of the category M1 (<3.5 t). The first major update to this regulation followed in 2017 and enhanced the regulation to include the vehicle group N1 (<3.5t). This included all important definitions for the TPMS. Furthermore, the vehicle type approval process is described and regulated.

What is new in the upcoming update?

With the new update, the regulation will be enhanced by the vehicle groups M2 and M3 (passenger vehicles) N2 and N3 (goods vehicles) and O3 and O4 (commercial trailers). Furthermore, Tyre Pressure Refill Systems (TPRS) and Central Tyre Inflation Systems (CTIS) are now included in the regulation. These new systems are the equivalent to a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS).

When will the new update come into force?

The updated UN ECE R141 regulation will come into effect from July 2022 with a 2-year plan. In July 2022, the regulation will apply to all new vehicle type approvals and two years later, in July 2024, the regulation will be valid for all new vehicle registrations.

What will be the impact for me as a trailer OEM?

The main impact will be that from July 2022, all new type approved trailers must have a Tyre Pressure Control System, and from July 2024, all new trailers that are sold will be required to have a Tyre Pressure Control System. This will have an impact on the cost structure of the trailer, which in turn will lead to an increased price for end users. Despite this, the new regulation will also provide positive aspects for a trailer OEM. Depending on which system is used, the result of the future VECTO (Vehicle Energy Consumption Calculation Tool) calculation can be positive affected. Furthermore, a Tyre Pressure Control System can be used to differentiate yourself from the competition and to offer a greener, more environmentally friendly trailer.

What will be the impact to me as a fleet?

The main impact is that from July 2024 at the latest, all newly purchased commercial vehicles must have a Tyre Pressure Control System. This update to the regulation will lead to a price increase for new commercial vehicles. Depends on which system is used, the return on invest can be even within 1 year. The correct tyre pressure will help you to reduce your tyre wear, increase your fuel economy and the reduce CO² emission. Therefore, a constant tyre pressure control and refill will have the benefit of a safer, more economic and greener fleet.

Next Steps?

To find out more about the UN ECE R141 Regulation changes, connect with us on the Celerity DRS LinkedIn page, or get in touch with our team of experts here.



FAQ

What is a TPMS?

A tyre pressure monitoring system or TPMS “…is a system fitted on a vehicle, able to perform a function to evaluate the inflation pressure of the tyres or the variation of this inflation pressure over time and to transmit corresponding information to the user while the vehicle is running.”

What is a TPRS?

A tyre pressure refill system or for short TPRS “…is a system fitted on a vehicle which refills underinflated tyres fitted to an axle of the vehicle with air pressure from a vehicle mounted reservoir (infrastructure) while the vehicle is running but not limited to.”

What is CTIS?

A central tyre inflation system or CTIS “…is a system fitted on a vehicle which controls the air pressure in each tyre fitted to an axle of the vehicle with air pressure from a vehicle mounted reservoir (infrastructure) while the vehicle is running but not limited to.”